Why Authenticity Matters in Sales

To take it back to basics, if everyone behaved and acted in a way true to themselves, Why Authenticity Matters in Salesauthenticity then becomes the norm. Remove personas and facades in business, in marketing, right across the board, and you have authenticity working very simply. When you remove facades you remove barriers, allowing people to connect, which is why authenticity has such an impact.

End of article, LOL!  Seriously we can go on about this issue, or we can just take it right back to basics and we’re done.  People buy from people they know, like and trust.  If you’re operating through some kind of business façade, or a way of being that you’ve been told or trained to use, you’re likely not being yourself. This means I don’t know who you are, and I also feel a bit uncomfortable without really knowing why. You’re not authentic and somehow I know this, anything that sets alarm bells ringing does not encourage me to buy, do business, or build any type of relationship.

Let’s face it, if you sat and thought about the people you like best in your life you can bet your bottom dollar that it will be the people you can most relate to.  How can you most relate to them?  Because you know their likes, who they are, their values, the way they do things. You know them.

In sales, there was once this myth that you needed a certain type of personality to sell, and it still persists somewhat. The truth is in business that YOU are the company’s Unique Selling Point or USP. In every business, even a big one with hundreds of employees, every single employee is the company USP. Because each time a transaction takes place or a relationship is built, there is a person involved. We need to uncover those people, we need those people to be who they really are, and then sales becomes something else. It becomes natural, people having a conversation and mutually helping each other.

Why Authenticity Matters in SalesI have spent 25 years working in sales, and for at least half of that time I had no idea why I was good at it.  Many other sales people commented that I wasn’t a typical sales person and it bothered me, because at that time I wanted to fit in.  We learn to want to fit in when we are young teens I think, and for some of us it continues into our adult lives and careers.  Since we set up Cre8 Sales in 2010, I have learnt a lot about why I am good at selling, and it largely is BECAUSE I am not a typical sales person, and more and more it is because I am being me, and not trying to be anyone else.

It can take a bit of time to become yourself if you’ve spent years being someone else.  I was speaking with a business owner recently, and asked him why he did what he did.  He had no idea.  This is quite normal, life takes over, people are on auto pilot, going to work to earn their living, buy their houses and cars, and finance holidays.  Sometimes we forget the most basic of things, like WHY we do what we do and WHO we’re doing it for.  When we can come back to ourselves and start to be REAL then life starts to feel good, selling feels good and it flows, it is easy. We do what’s right for us in a way that’s right for us, giving us fulfilment and satisfaction, which is one of the real whys that we’re doing it for in the first place!

So take off the suit, either metaphorically speaking or really take it off!  Just be who you areCre8 Sales Solutions and people will love you for it.
Authenticity is going to be a big buzz word over the next few years in marketing speak, watch this space as big and small businesses start to get real and look at what really matters.  There are already plenty of articles around sparking it off.  Don’t worry about what anyone else thinks, do your own thing, because being you is never wrong.

For more information please call us on 0121 347 6601. www.cre8salessolutions.co.uk

 

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